Zabalaza #2 (March 2002)

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Zabalaza #2 cover
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Contents:

  • The Case of the Decorated Donkey
  • They Murdered an Anarchist
  • Against the WCAR
  • The ANC-NNP Alliance: What Do Anarchists Say?
  • “War Against Terrorism” or “Killing for Oil”?: The Real Reasons for the Invasion of Afghanistan
  • Whose World? Whose Forum?:- The World Social Forum
    and the Anti-Globalisation Movement
  • The Black Bloc: A Disposable Tactic
  • Religious Fundamentalist Regimes: A Lesson from the Iranian Revolution 1978-1979
  • The Anarchist Economic Alternative to Globalisation
  • Who needs the WSSD?
  • Teachings of the State
  • The WSSD
  • Obituary: Hamba Kahle Wilstar Choongo!

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Zabalaza #1 (April 2001)

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Zabalaza 01 cover
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Contents:

  • The Neo-Liberal Agenda: GEAR Versus the Working Class
  • Phansi GEAR Phansi!
  • The Need for a Revolutionary Anarchist Federation
  • Your Money or Your Life: The World Bank, IMF and Neo-Imperialism
  • An Anarchist Perspective on the South African AIDS Question
  • Zimbabwe: Land Invasions and Lessons for the Working Class

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God and the State

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by Mikhail Bakunin

with a Preface by Carlo Cafeiro and Elisée Reclus


Bakunin’s most famous work, published in various lengths, this version is the most complete form of the work published hitherto.

Originally titled “Dieu et l’état”, Bakunin intended it to be part of the second portion to a larger work named “The Knouto-Germanic Empire and the Social Revolution” (Knouto-Germanic Empire is in reference to a treaty between Russia and Germany at the time), but the work was never completed. (from book introduction)


Listen to an audio recording of Mikhail Bakunin’s God and the State


  • Preface
  • Chapter I
  • Chapter II
  • Chapter III
  • Chapter IV

Preface to the First French Edition

One of us is soon to tell in all its details the story of the life of Michael Bakunin, but its general features are already sufficiently familiar. Friends and enemies know that this man was great in thought, will, persistent energy; they know also with what lofty contempt he looked down upon wealth, rank, glory, all the wretched ambitions which most human beings are base enough to entertain. A Russian gentleman related by marriage to the highest nobility of the empire, he was one of the first to enter that intrepid society of rebels who were able to release themselves from traditions, prejudices, race and class interests, and set their own comfort at naught. With them he fought the stern battle of life, aggravated by imprisonment, exile, all the dangers and all the sorrows that men of self-sacrifice have to undergo during their tormented existence.

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Stateless Socialism: Anarchism

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From “The Political Philosophy of Bakunin”
by G.P. Maximoff
1953, The Free Press, NY


Effect of the Great Principles Proclaimed by the French Revolution.

From the time when the Revolution brought down to the masses its Gospel – not the mystic but the rational, not the heavenly but the earthly, not the divine but the human Gospel, the Gospel of the Rights of Man – ever since it proclaimed that all men are equal, that all men are entitled to liberty and equality, the masses of all European countries, of all the civilized world, awakening gradually from the sleep which had kept them in bondage ever since Christianity drugged them with its opium, began to ask themselves whether they too, had the right to equality, freedom, and humanity.

As soon as this question was posed, the people, guided by their admirable sound sense as well as by their instincts, realized that the first condition of their real emancipation, or of their humanization, was above all a radical change in their economic situation. The question of daily bread is to them justly the first question, for as it was noted by Aristotle, man, in order to think, in order to feel himself free, in order to become man, must be freed from the material cares of daily life. For that matter, the bourgeois, who are so vociferous in their outcries against the materialism of the people and who preach to the latter the abstinences of idealism, know it very well, for they themselves preach it only by word and not by example.

The second question arising before the people – that of leisure after work – is the indispensable condition of humanity. But bread and leisure can never be obtained apart from a radical transformation of existing society, and that explains why the Revolution, impelled by the implications of its own principles, gave birth to Socialism.

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Marxism, Freedom, and the State

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Translated and Edited with a Biographical Sketch
by K. J. Kenafick

TO THE MEMORY OF
J. W. (Chummy) FLEMING
WHO, FOR NEARLY SIXTY YEARS
UPHELD THE CAUSE OF FREEDOM
AT THE YARA BANK OPEN AIR FORUM
MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA

– K. J. Kenafick


Table of Contents

  • Foreword
  • Life of Bakunin
  1. Introductory
  2. Marxist Ideology
  3. The State and Marxism
  4. Internationalism and the State
  5. Social Revolution and the State
  6. Political Action and the Workers
  • Appendix

Liberty for all, and a natural respect for that liberty: such are the essential conditions of international solidarity.

– Bakunin


Foreword

In my book Michael Bakunin and Karl Marx, I stated in a footnote that I intended to reprint certain passages from Bakunin in a booklet to be entitled Marxism, Anarchism and the State. The present work is a fulfillment of that intention; but I have slightly altered the title, because on reflection, I felt that Bakunin was here treating of wider and deeper matters than merely the merits of one political philosophy as against another. He was treating of the whole question of man’s freedom in relation to society, to the community.

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The Capitalist System

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by Michael Bakunin

This pamphlet is an excerpt from The Knouto-Germanic Empire and the Social Revolution and included in The Complete Works of Michael Bakunin under the title “Fragment.” Parts of the text were originally translated into English by G.P. Maximoff for his anthology of Bakunin’s writings, with missing paragraphs translated by Jeff Stein from the Spanish edition, Diego Abad de Santillan, trans. (Buenos Aires 1926) vol. III, pp. 181-196.


Is it necessary to repeat here the irrefutable arguments of Socialism which no bourgeois economist has yet succeeded in disproving? What is property, what is capital in their present form? For the capitalist and the property owner they mean the power and the right, guaranteed by the State, to live without working. And since neither property nor capital produces anything when not fertilized by labour – that means the power and the right to live by exploiting the work of someone else, the right to exploit the work of those who possess neither property nor capital and who thus are forced to sell their productive power to the lucky owners of both. Note that I have left out of account altogether the following question: In what way did property and capital ever fall into the hands of their present owners? This is a question which, when envisaged from the points of view of history, logic, and justice, cannot be answered in any other way but one which would serve as an indictment against the present owners. I shall therefore confine myself here to the statement that property owners and capitalists, inasmuch as they live not by their own productive labour but by getting land rent, house rent, interest upon their capital, or by speculation on land, buildings, and capital, or by the commercial and industrial exploitation of the manual labour of the proletariat, all live at the expense of the proletariat. (Speculation and exploitation no doubt also constitute a sort of labour, but altogether non-productive labour.)

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